Transcription – English – Arelene Dato

16. Arlene Dato.mp4: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

16. Arlene Dato.mp4: this mp4 video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Arlene Dato:
Okay. So I'm here because CAERS asked me to show up as living proof of the neurological damage that the Pfizer vaccine has done to me.

Trish Wood:
And could you tell your story of of getting the vaccine and then what what transpired, please?

Arlene Dato:
So I got the first vaccine in April last year. And a week after I got the vaccine, my leg, I started limping on my left leg and the leg started becoming weaker. So I didn't bother with it for a couple of weeks, but it continued getting worse. So then I called my family doctor and he said. We would need to do a slew of bloodwork to figure out what's going on. So I did a blood work. And a few days after he called and he said that my inflammation markers were through the roof. And they were so high that it would I was borderline for an autoimmune condition like lupus. So he said that we would need to continue doing blood work over the following weeks because he would need to justify to public health why I couldn't get the second shot. So we continued doing the testing. And it continued to be high. But a few days before I was supposed to get the second shot, it dropped a little. So he said, okay, that means your body is coping with it, so go ahead and get a second shot. So I did. And a few days after my left leg started buckling, I started falling. I even sprained my ankle. So then I called him and I told him what was happening. He said, well, it sounded like some kind of motor neuron problem. And he did bloodwork again and a levels. The inflammation markers were back to the level they were before. So he sent me to see a neurologist. So I saw a neurologist in September last year.

Arlene Dato:
She did a lot of nerve conduction tests and an EMG, and she said that the motor neurons in both legs were damaged and she couldn't understand what had caused it. So then she decided to do bloodwork to see if it was something like West Nile or. HIV that could cause it. But everything came back negative, and I waited for two months to hear from her and she didn't call. So then I called the office and I demanded to get a follow up appointment to find out what was going on. So she saw me again in December and she did all the tests over again and she said that my motor neurons had degenerated more and she couldn't figure out what was going on and she didn't know what the reason for it was. So she was going to refer me to McMaster University to a clinic there. So eventually in March, I got to MacMaster. And that's when I realized she had. Referred me to an ALS clinic. So then I started questioning the doctor, like, why am I at an ALS clinic? There's no ALS person in my family for like three generations on both sides. How could I suddenly have ALS? So he said, Well, maybe it's cancer or something else. So he did all the tests that the former neurologist did, and he did full body MRI and CT scan and bloodwork. And then in April he called me into his office and he said, You've got ALS. So I'm like. What do you mean? I have Alice.

Arlene Dato:
The Alice doesn't just appear magically. And the thing is, I didn't want to take that vaccine in the first place because my sister is a viral immunologist. She has worked on creating vaccines for zoonotic diseases. And she kept saying to me that the data is off. They are manipulating the data. They are not doing all the stages in the tests that they're supposed to do. So I didn't want to take it. But the thing is, I had to because as a college professor, it was mandated that if we wanted to continue being employed, we had to take it. So then when the neurologist, he didn't realize that my sister was giving me a lot of scholarly research articles to read. And so then I said to him. So why is it not mine, which is multifocal motor neuropathy, which is what my sister thought there was. Because she was tracking what was happening from the first dose of the vaccine. So he says, Well, I did antibody testing and it came back negative. I said, But. To my knowledge, the antibody testing is only accurate for 40% of people. It misses it for 60% of the people. So he was surprised that I actually knew what I was talking about. And then he said, Oh. Okay. And that's when I managed to convince him to actually put me on IVIG treatment alongside the ALS medicine, because if I had no knowledge of this IVIG treatment, he would have just thrown me in to the ALS medicine.

Trish Wood:
Can I just clarify what you're saying here? Just so. So you have a condition that mimics ALS, which is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Lou Gehrig's disease. Right. But you also have something else that could be vaccine related or that is vaccine related. You believe that's called M

Arlene Dato:
MMN.

Trish Wood:
MMN

Arlene Dato:
Yes.

Trish Wood:
So he's fixated on the ALS. You believe it's the MMN?

Arlene Dato:
Yes.

Trish Wood:
Because of the vaccine injury, is that correct? So he's now treating you for both.

Arlene Dato:
Right.

Trish Wood:
Right. So sorry. And so the blood work showed what he did. Blood work? And what did it show?

Arlene Dato:
The blood what he did was for the antibodies to prove that it was not. MMN.

Trish Wood:
I see.

Arlene Dato:
But it comes back is inaccurate because it only picks it up, and 40% of people got it. So then he put me on this medication, because by then I had developed twitching in my legs and my abdomen and my back, and he was just fitting symptoms into ALS because he runs an ALS clinic and he gets funding for ALS. So I'm still not convinced I have ALS. And then the medication he put me on got me even sicker. So. The only reason my legs were functioning up to up to two months ago was because every day I was working out on a glider and doing leg press to make sure that my legs were staying tuned. But when he put me on the ALS medication, I was nauseous all the time. I started losing weight and he told me, I cannot lose weight because it would compromise the integrity of my thigh muscles and. I was generally so exhausted. If I went up the stairs, I would have to go lie down. So I spent most of the day lying down for an entire month. So I told him I wanted to get off it because my quality of life is so terrible. What's the point of extending my life? If the quality of life is so bad. So it took me off it two weeks ago. And I'm doing much better since then. And what I've noticed with the IVIG treatment is that whenever I get it, my muscles in my legs feel stronger. For about a week and. The twitching goes away. So that's why I'm not convinced it's ALS, because. I went from being functioning last year to. Being so dependent this year.

Arlene Dato:
I can't even work. All of my lectures are 3 hours live. I. I can't stand it for [inaudible] for 3 hours. Because my legs, my legs… I'm sorry. My leg keeps [?]. And when I fought good, I covered it up.

Arlene Dato:
Two weeks ago, I fell in the gas station. I couldn't get up. My daughter couldn't pick me up. And she had to ask a guy who was putting gas next to us to come pick me up. So I can't go anywhere alone anymore. I can't drive. I can't do anything. Somebody has to be with me all the time. I can't function in the kitchen because I can't stand for more than half an hour. If I sit for more than half an hour, my legs cramp. You can't cook and clean. I can't do anything I used to do before.

Trish Wood:
What what would make your life better right now? What I mean, aside from obviously being restored to to full health. What do you need?

Arlene Dato:
Well, actually, getting the doctors to acknowledge that there's a connection with vaccine based on the timeline in which everything happened. Instead of them woefully ignoring it. Even the neurologist and my family doctor were not aware of that Pfizer vaccine that Dr. Pinn was talking about. I had informed them of it. And on that list, motor neuropathy is one of the adverse events, advance events listed by Pfizer. In that eight page list of adverse events. So as far as I'm concerned, I did not give informed consent because. I had no knowledge that all these adverse events were a possibility.

Trish Wood:
I'm sure the panel has some questions or comments to make. Thank you.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
Arlene, I just want to say thank you for your testimony. It's. It's difficult. I think I speak on behalf of the rest of the panelists and the audience for all of us to hear the stories this afternoon. A, because of what you've endured from your injuries. But what makes it even more shocking is the reactions that you've received from health care workers, colleagues, friends and so forth. And I just want to let you know, we're listening and we hear all of you and what you've been telling us today. What did you teach at college?

Arlene Dato:
My PhD is in English, so I taught five different English courses.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
Congratulations.

Arlene Dato:
That's down the drain now.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
Did any have any of your doctors or anybody you've worked with for a health care professional perspective offered to report this to the adverse events.

Arlene Dato:
And what is interesting is my neurologist, the only thing he said to me was that sometimes vaccines can activate things that are dormant in your genes. And maybe that's what happened.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
Thank you.

Preston Manning:
Have you written your story down? No. You'll be capable of doing it. I'll bet you.

Arlene Dato:
Yes, I.

Preston Manning:
Would. I think that would be helpful. I think that would be helpful. And we would be interested in receiving it. Okay. Yeah.

David Ross:
Thank you for sharing your story. Have you had any contact or support or acknowledgement from your college that employed you and mandated this vaccine?

Arlene Dato:
Because the thing about the colleges is if you tell them you have a disability, they don't renew your contract, especially if you need accommodations in the classroom. So it's a catch 22 situation. So all I did was I notified the. Associate Dean that I wouldn't be able to work again.

David Ross:
Well, I'm not a lawyer, but I think that you might be able to benefit from a lawyer's advice on this. Okay. And I'm so sorry for your for your injuries.

Arlene Dato:
Thank you.

Trish Wood:
Thank you so much. We're very grateful.

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