Transcription – English – Max Daigle

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Max Daigle:
I am the president of the Canadian Adverse Event Reporting System. I was injured by the H1N1 vaccine. Back in 2009, I almost died. I almost died again four years ago, so I am still injured. I'll. I seen a lot of people that were. Neglected that were not part of the conversation. That. Had no voice. And had the the proof and evidence. Of what these inoculations could do. And. I decided to build this system. This reporting system for them to share their stories and have evidence to counter what we've been heard, we've been hearing for the last two a couple of years.

Trish Wood:
So you're talking specifically now about the COVID 19 vaccines.

Max Daigle:
Exactly.

Trish Wood:
So tell me what you've built and how it works and what your what you're seeing.

Max Daigle:
So. We build a system where people can report directly to us. We do not discriminate if they feel they had an adverse event. It's up to them to decide if it could be or it is. We do not do what the medical practitioners have been doing that we've seen where they discriminate. They say it's not related to the COVID 19 vaccine without even proving that it's not related and that should not be accepted. And like I said, we're giving them a chance to report if they feel that they had been injured. These people need these things should be reported. There's such a law in Canada that's called Vanessa's law, and it states that any possible adverse event must be reported. So if it's possible, it should be reported.

Trish Wood:
And is it a questionnaire or something? How does it work if someone has?

Max Daigle:
It's a form. I was put together by people that worked in private sector that. That reported directly to Health Canada before for a number of years. So we've basically based their experience to put those forms together. And people report themselves. We have health intake facilitators across Canada that call them up and verify what they're saying, which should be common practice here in Canada.

Trish Wood:
I know that especially Susan is going to want to drill down on this with you, but I did want to just ask something before I pass to the panel. And that is, you seem like you're kind of driven by a passion that you're you are seeing things that are are not good. Am I reading you correctly?

Max Daigle:
You are. It's for me personally. It's been a lot of weight on my shoulders. You know, listening to these people, you know, being neglected, being demonized, being ridiculed by your families, by your family. Physicians, by the government. It should not be. So where? What happened to humanity? Why can't we care? So this is part of all the reports that Chris has received. It's not all of them. That's a lot of reports and I hope this will help reflect what we've seen within CAERS from the test. The people that will be testifying here that got neglected, they got hurt.

Trish Wood:
I know you wanted to go ahead.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
Thank you. And thanks, Max. I. This really is a valuable resource for Canadians. I think it was long needed and there was there were people asking for something like this for quite a while. Can you tell me, when did you start the CAERS database?

Max Daigle:
We started off with New Brunswick Adverse Adverse Event Reporting System back. We launched on December 2nd and we decided to launch it nationally at the end of February.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
So that's February 2022? Yeah, correct. So you've already how many reports do you think you have altogether?

Max Daigle:
About a thousand.

Trish Wood:
Wow.

Max Daigle:
And I'm thinking this is just the tip of the iceberg because we're all volunteers, within CAERS. And it's very hard to reach everyone that possibly had an adverse event, which maybe there's a lot of people there that have symptoms that they can't even connect, that it's possible related to their to to taking the COVID 19 vaccine.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
What factors do you see that is limiting or perhaps barriers to you getting more reports in?

Max Daigle:
It's it's the resources, the manpower. It's the. It's the showing that there's a safe place of being able to report your possible adverse event or adverse event. It's how do you reach these people?

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
Do you think it's being publicized or censored in some way? It's probably a better way to ask that.

Max Daigle:
Well, it's there's a multitude of different things, right. There's there's family physicians that are the first one that has to have to report it. And they're not reporting it. Some of them for possibly different reasons. And then it has to go to a to a local public health. If the family physician decides to report and then it can be denied there, and then it has to go up to public health as the province or territory, and then it can be denied there. And then it has to go up to the system within Health Canada and then it can be denied there. So these things should be all reported just similar, let's say, at the very system which, you know, there's numbers of 1 to 10% that are reported. So what is really the picture is are we just looking at the tip of the iceberg? So what's the situation and what's the long term effects on these individuals that got injured and the people that are, you know, possibly carrying things that might hurt them down the road?

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
I just have to really quick questions. The first one, though, is what other support you said you have people call those who are injured. Can you explain what that process is and how important that is to the system?

Max Daigle:
So what we do is when people submit a report, they can choose to have a follow up interview by a health intake facilitator within CAERS, either by email or by telephone. So if they choose to have a follow up interview, they choose that option, leave their phone number and email address, or vice versa. You may try to make first contact to give them a chance to at least be validated because for their mental health, that is a big thing, you know, to be left in the dark, being ridiculed by doctors and government and media and even family members. Sometimes these people, you know, it's not right.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
That's right. And I was just one. Have you had any chance to review any kind of overall notice that there are any upticks or any statistics overall from the data that you have gathered so far?

Max Daigle:
It's very hard, right, because we think we're all volunteers. Right. And I'm sure you know as well as me, it's hard to sacrifice so much in so many hours and trying to find the right people that want to do things from the heart. Do the right thing to. But hopefully we can find the right people to help with and CAERS to. To show, you know, and help these people and show the greater public that these things are not as safe as what they told us.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
Thank you, Max.

Max Daigle:
You're welcome.

Preston Manning:
Max, can you go over again? What exactly do you do with these reports to try to get him into the government or Health Canada? What's the process after you get the report?

Max Daigle:
We have no avenue.

Preston Manning:
None at all?

Max Daigle:
None at all.

Preston Manning:
So if one was to create a receptor of some kind in the government, any ideas, what would that be like? Where would that be located? What would it be? Are you talking about a regulatory body or are you talking about if you had to create some place for your reports to plug in, that would make a difference. What form would that take? Where would that be?

Max Daigle:
It's hard to tell a person, right? Because you know the communication. You know, between government and the public, sometimes it's very divisive and try to find a way to work together with the government. They don't seem to be on that. We've to to to accommodate that. So. I wish there was, but I hope this citizens hearing is going to help bring to light that these things needs to happen. There should be a national investigation to to find out what the truth is and we can work towards.

Preston Manning:
Do you feel that the first level of that reporting device should be at the provincial level? Health being first and foremost a provincial responsibility, a province first, fed second. Or is this something that should go right up to the.

Max Daigle:
I'm not sure it's. You know, it depends on the law is probably right, because there are certain laws that would apply to provincial level and municipal level and in federal level. Right. So we would need some investigation to find out where the best avenue to start that process.

Preston Manning:
So this this might be a line of inquiry for us eventually to get to is what what kind of a receptor is required at the governmental level to receive these kind of reports. Yeah, well, thank you for this. You're welcome.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
I just had a couple more questions, Max. I was wondering what kind of feedback you've received from people who have used the CAERS system.

Max Daigle:
It's a lot of people that do the follow up interviews and they're sitting there sometimes for an hour, an hour and a half on the phone. You know. Yeah. They're very, very grateful to have a chance to talk to someone that, you know, listens to them. And, you know, cares for them.

Dr. Susan Natsheh:
It's very important. Very, very important. How about just wondering overall impact on the workers who are taking in these calls? What kind of. It must be a heavy burden on all of you. It is. Thank you for doing that.

Max Daigle:
Welcome. It is. You know, everybody that we're that volunteers with in CAERS. They're all health care practitioners. They've seen trauma before. And to be honest, the last couple of weeks, we've lost volunteers because they can't do it no more. That's what they do for a living, listening to people in trauma. And you just. Just listen. These stories, they just. You know, it's breaking them down.

Trish Wood:
I have one quick question for you, because I know you kind of pull the lens back to 30,000 feet. They're doing vaccine mandates on a vaccine with a truncated clinical trials process, right?

Max Daigle:
Correct.

Trish Wood:
You would think that the health protection branch, which regulates safety and efficacy of vaccines, would be calling you. Has anybody ever called you from any of the regulatory agencies to say, what do you guys get? What are you seeing? Can we see your data? Anybody like that?

Max Daigle:
I wish they would, because if they would be willing to collaborate in trying to help these people, I'm sure I would. But why aren't they? That's the question.

Trish Wood:
Okay. Well, thanks, Max, very much for doing this. We're very grateful.

Max Daigle:
You're welcome. Just one last comment for the panelists to people here, the people listening in. I asked it. You open your hearts. You listen to these people. Listen with your heart and you be the judge. What is going really going on? Thank you.

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